Jump Racing – National Hunt Festivals

What's even better than spending a day biting your nails to the quick at the Jump races? Spending several consecutive days going mad with suspense at a Jump racing festival that’s what! The two major National Hunt Festivals in the United Kingdom, the Cheltenham Festival and the Aintree Grand National Festival, offer programs that are sure to make it an unforgettable experience for every Jump racing enthusiast.

Packed with Hurdle Racing and spectacular courses for Steeple Chase events, a Jump racing festival covers all aspects. There are numerous races with various Grades with every type of race that you could possibly want on the National Hunt scene. There are races for juveniles, novices, and seasoned jumpers. On top of that there are opportunities for inexperienced jockeys, as well as old hands at the game. In total, the experiences offered by a National Hunt festival are almost priceless.

Marvel as the best contenders of the season go head to head in the most prestigious chases and hurdles of the year! Check out new talent on the track during the bumper races! Get up close and personal with your racing favourites in the parade ring! Most importantly, indulge yourself in the festival atmosphere and spirit.

Horse Racing Festival Survival Guide

If you are going racing then there are a few things that you should know. There may be a dress code for certain parts of the course and so you may need to check the relevant course website to find out what that is. The entry fees for certain sections of the course will vary quite widely and from course to course.

Try to arrive early to avoid the rush and you may be able to find yourself a great vantage point on the course. There are a few extra little things that you may need to know but the key thing is to have fun. The race course staff are used to people not knowing the rules.

There are hundreds of people that will turn up to the races that will have never been to a race meeting before. So there is absolutely no need to feel any pressure at all. If there is anything that you don't understand then just ask.

Horse Racing Festival Survival Guide

If you are going racing then there are a few things that you should know. There may be a dress code for certain parts of the course and so you may need to check the relevant course website to find out what that is. The entry fees for certain sections of the course will vary quite widely and from course to course.

Try to arrive early to avoid the rush and you may be able to find yourself a great vantage point on the course. There are a few extra little things that you may need to know but the key thing is to have fun. The race course staff are used to people not knowing the rules.

There are hundreds of people that will turn up to the races that will have never been to a race meeting before. So there is absolutely no need to feel any pressure at all. If there is anything that you don't understand then just ask.

On Course Bookmakers

Horse racing can't be horse racing without betting. This is what injects the thrill into horse racing for the spectators. If it wasn’t for the betting aspect, whether it's online or offline, horse racing would be relatively dull and nowhere near as entertaining as other types of spectator sports.

Just how do you go about placing a bet on course? Well, it's simple. You can place a bet either on the tote, at one of the betting kiosks, or with the on-course bookmakers in the ring. The most exciting way is to place bets with the on-course bookmakers as this really feels like you are entering into the world of horse racing.

Remember that every horse has odds attached to it. These odds have been carefully worked out by professional odds compilers off track and well before the race starts. Complex data is fed into algorithms and probabilities are worked out. This then equates to betting odds. If it becomes clear that the favourite has a 50% chance of winning then 50% expressed as odds is even money.

The bookmaker attempts to make some money on these odds and so shaves them slightly, to say 4/5 and that's their profit. They may alter their odds even more if large volumes of liquidity comes pouring in, in an attempt to balance their books. The odds can be anything but they all depend on one thing, this is to do with the probability of your horse winning.

The greater the probability, the lower the odds and it really is that simple. So even if you have no knowledge of horses, a quick glance at the betting market will reveal to you who the best horses are.

The Actual Race Itself

Once you have placed your bet, now it is time for the race. As a rule, depending on the meeting, there will be between six and seven races on any given day. The time of the first race will differ based on the time of the year. Light levels are much better in the summer months and it's common for races to start at say 1.30pm or even 2pm.

Race times are brought forward in the winter months for obvious reasons. Each race will be over a varying distance with different numbers of competitors. This is dependent on just how many horses are entered for that race. In the week, the average number of runners in a race can be somewhere between ten to twelve!

However, at the big meetings that can sometimes jump up to twenty or more. Make sure to break down your betting bank so that you can bet on each race. You will be amazed at the atmosphere of a real live race meeting and even more so at the festival.

When the race starts, you may find yourself in a position to not be able to see the action. Remember that racecourses are so big that the action will usually be on the far side of the track. Never fear though, if you position yourself near the finishing line then you will be able to see the most important part of the race.

Any horse race doesn't really get going until the final two furlongs anyway. The first part of the race is merely about the horses jockeying for position. However, this isn't really important and the most important part of the day is simply being there and having a great time. So the next time you go racing or the first time you go racing, forget about whether you win or lose and just let your hair down.